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  • Lisa Beatha

    Lisa Beatha (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Lisa Beatha

    Lisa Beatha (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Commissioner Cassano

    Salvatore Cassano

  • Commissioner Cassano

    Salvatore Cassano

  • Danielle Discala

    Danielle Discala (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Danielle Discala

    Danielle Discala (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Frank Fowler

    Frank Fowler (Photo by Heather Ainsworth)

  • Frank Fowler

    Frank Fowler (Photo by Heather Ainsworth)

  • Jonathan Henderson

    Jonathan Henderson

  • Charisse Jamroze

    Charisse Jamroze (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Charisse Jamroze

    Charisse Jamroze (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Jack Licata

    Jack Licata (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Jack Licata

    Jack Licata (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Dondi McKellar

    Dondi McKellar (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Dondi McKellar

    Dondi McKellar (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Mark Otto

    Mark Otto (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Mark Otto

    Mark Otto (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Juan Serrano

    Juan Serrano (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

  • Juan Serrano

    Juan Serrano (Photo by Sasha Maslov)

 

For veterans returning home from the battlefield, the transition can be as challenging as actually serving in the military. Some veterans must learn how to live with lost limbs or other physical wounds and scars suffered overseas. Others struggle to cope with post-traumatic stress disorder, depression or other mental health issues. And at times, protests against wars and conflicts have left veterans feeling unwanted or unappreciated, despite their sacrifices.

But for many military veterans, the discipline and skills acquired in one of the five branches prove to be invaluable assets as they adjust to civilian life. Serving in the military can be a launching pad for a run at political office. And it’s not just voters – a distinguished record of military service is equally appealing to many employers in the public, private and nonprofits sectors.

What’s more, many arrive home deeply instilled with a commitment to serve their country and actively seek out opportunities to serve their fellow veterans and the public at large. In this special section, City & State puts a spotlight on those veterans who are still serving in other ways.

We honor high-ranking government officials and mid-level staffers who are assisting and protecting New Yorkers here at home. We recognize business executives who are finding ways to help their fellow veterans and we applaud nonprofit leaders who are assisting those most in need.

Read About the 10 Veterans Here