Why Michael Bloomberg should(n't) run

Michael Bloomberg
Michael Bloomberg
Photo illustration Alex Law

Why Michael Bloomberg should(n't) run

Based on his time at City Hall, would he actually be a good president?
November 7, 2018

In 1997, Michael Bloomberg published “Bloomberg by Bloomberg.” Starting with his dismissal from a top Wall Street firm in 1981, it chronicles how he launched Bloomberg LP and built it into a hugely successful company. The book was reissued in 2001, when he was mounting a bid for New York City mayor as a Republican.

By the time Bloomberg left City Hall at the end of 2013, he had established a profile as a politician that rivaled his reputation as a billionaire entrepreneur. As he gears up for a presidential run in 2020, now as a Democrat, an updated version of “Bloomberg by Bloomberg” is set to come out next month. It presumably will offer a positive spin on his 12 years running the city, much like the original book was a celebration of – and sales pitch for – his company.

Of course, Bloomberg isn’t the only one telling his story. One recurring theme is the difficulties the ex-Republican will face in winning over a Democratic base that has shifted further to the left since he was in office. City & State looks at the former mayor from another angle: Based on his time at City Hall, would he actually be a good president?

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Image Credit: 
Photo illustration Alex Law

Can Michael Bloomberg save the planet?

Lying in bed in the dead of night, gripped by anxiety because our president is unmoored, it seems almost impossible to contemplate another four years under this president. The dangers and obscenities flowing from the White House each day have triggered a state of panic among Democrats, and more than a few Republicans. What if flipping the House isn’t enough? What if this kamikaze presidency is extended past 2020?

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Michael Bloomberg
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Michael Bloomberg
Title Text: 
Michael Bloomberg
Image Credit: 
Photo illustration Alex Law
Bloomberg killed New York City’s soul

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg wants to run for president in 2020, so he said he dropped tens of millions of dollars, out of his $51.8 billion estimate net worth, on helping Democratic House and Senate candidates in the midterm elections. He also recently registered as a Democrat for the first time since 2001. The prospect of a Bloomberg presidency warms the hearts of centrist pundits who believe his orderliness, love of data and great wealth are “antidotes” to Donald Trump.

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Andrew Kirtzman
is the president of Kirtzman Strategies, a strategic communications firm, and the former host of “Inside City Hall” on NY1 and “Kirtzman and Company” on WCBS-TV.
Kate Albright-Hanna
is a former presidential campaign staffer for Barack Obama and a documentary filmmaker.
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